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Ringoes, New Jersey steve@hitemptech.com
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Seaburn Marine Waste Oil Combustion Systems

260 Barrels Per Hour Capacity

HTT 30FM-20-CGOL and 60FM-40-CGOL Waste Oil Combustion Systems

In the early 1980s, a company named Seaburn asked us to design and price a liquid waste incineration system that could be built within a standard 40 ft container to destroy waste liquids from industrial plants. These units could be mounted on ships or barges anchored at sea and stacked so several systems may be operated from one central control station.

Waste liquids can be tested at the source to determine content and then pumped into liquid waste containers for transfer to a ship or barge containing the burner system at any convenient port within a few days. The ship is designed with a control station, piping, pumps, filters, liquid heaters, etc, to connect the burners with the liquid waste containers. Waste burning continues until the containers are empty when they are returned to port for unloading and any additional reloading. If a burner system needs service, it can be quickly replaced while in port and the damaged unit sent for repair.

The only other similar technology available in the 1980s was the Vulcanus 1 and 2, however they proved a failure as the waste onboard liquid tanks corroded and the refractory deteriorated due to weather exposure. Additionally, when a Vulcanus unit was damaged, it took a year for repairs to be completed to allow a second burn. Shortly thereafter, legislation was passed and liquid waste burning at see was prohibited. The decision to prohibit burning at sea was not a result of any technical issues, but was determined strictly by politics.

Marine Waste Oil Combustion

The present BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is of immediate major concern with the cleanup being accomplished basically in three steps. First, removal of the oil from the ocean and shoreline and second processing, filtering and separation of the collected oil and water. The third step is disposal of the oil to prevent further impact on the environment.

Several companies are capable of providing the equipment to collect and process the oil-water mixture with the separation technology offered by Kevin Costner being one of the available options. That leaves only the destruction of the oil collected and the most efficient way is to burn it. Various systems are now being tested so a decision can be made on what would be the best method.

The most recent efforts involving the burning of waste oil the is to place 20 ft shipping containers containing small incineration systems with separators and filters onto shrimp boats. These boats would travel around the Gulf picking up oil, processing and then burning the oil collected with compensation being on a per barrel basis. Unfortunately, these burning units are too small to have an immediate impact and will require a great deal of fuel to operate. They will also require an on board, qualified engineer to operate the filtration and oil water separation systems necessary to make each boat operate efficiently and safely. While control of the collection, processing, and burning cannot be monitored, flow-meters and recorders can be modified to record data. Since each boat is compensated according to the quantity of oil they collect and burn, short cuts may be taken further compromising the environment and the safety of the boat crews.

A more practical approach is to use the shrimp boats to collect the oil in tanks taking care to collect a minimal amount of water. When the on board tanks are full, the oil can be pumped to a larger transfer vessel or taken directly to a barge where it can be processed and burned. The oil collected at the barge can be tested for water content and the vessel paid for quantity of oil collected with the amount adjusted to account for water concentration. The less water content, the more the vessel is paid per barrel. The burner systems would be placed on barges and the barges located at various locations around the spill area. Since the collection ships can load and unload quickly, they could be deployed in priority areas such as along the coastline where the worst pollution damage potential exists.

Seaburn Systems are modular in design and constructed within a 20 or 40 foot shipping container that will operate at up to 30 to 60 MM BTU per hour. Each system includes the 30 or 60 MM BTU/hr oil burner, control system, fabricated chamber lined with high temperature refractory and an 8 foot lined stack.  Systems have and optional discharge for either a horizontal or vertical stack. Each system includes a 1-Year Limited Warranty and is competitively priced.

The Seaburn Systems concept uses standard shipping containers at a standard loading port to handle placement of the units on a ship or barge. The units can be set side by side with a stack bolted to the top and are also available with an optional stack connection at the end, which allows the units to fire and discharge horizontally. Systems may be stacked vertically when operated in this manner. Should a system require repair that cannot be performed at sea, the unit may be quickly removed and replaced when the ship returns to port.

A multi-system setup with 5 systems across, stacked 3 systems high could burn as much as 260 barrels per hour. The ship can be anchored with the bow into the wind allowing the horizontal discharge to be off the stern. All PLC controls for each unit can be monitored from a central control station on board.

Storage, Processing and Feed Systems

Support components including pump/receiving stations are located near the bow enabling the pump station to accept oil from the collection fleet, which can offload to a barge. The oil would then be processed with oil/water separators, including chemical treatment if necessary, heated to 50oC and filtered. Processed oil is then moved to a storage/supply tank supplying a recirculation distribution line connected to each of the systems.

Once processed oil is available, the systems can be brought online with #2 fuel oil, or a higher grade of the crude being processed. When the system reaches operating temperature, the fuel oil is changed over to the processed waste oil. Air vents from each of the process stations can be vented to the combustion inlets of the systems further reducing emissions.

Systems can be mass produced using the modular design described above. Final assembly includes mounting in 20 or 40 ft. sea carrier trailers, control panel with main power connections and remote interface controls allowing the systems to operate independently from a main control station or pilot house on board the ship. Systems are built to meet Coast Guard Compliance and Certification.  Other fabrication sources may be used as delivery requirements dictate.

HTT 30FM-20-CGOL and 60FM-40-CGOL Waste Oil Combustion Systems

The following describes both the HTT 30FM-20-CGOL and 60FM-40-CGOL waste oil combustion systems.
Click to enlarge
Seaburn Systems are modular in design and constructed within a 20-40FT shipping container that will operate at up to 30-60 MM BTU/hr. Each system includes either the 30 or 60 MM BTU/hr oil burner, control system, fabricated chamber lined with high temperature refractory and an 8 ft. lined stack.  Systems have and optional discharge for either a horizontal or vertical stack. Each system includes a 1-Year Limited Warranty and is competitively priced.

The Seaburn Systems concept uses standard shipping containers at a standard loading port to handle placement of the units on a ship or barge. The units can be set side by side with a stack bolted to the top and are also available with an optional stack connection at the end, which allows the units to fire and discharge horizontally. Systems may be stacked vertically when operated in this manner. Should a system require repair that cannot be performed at sea, the unit may be quickly removed and replaced when the ship returns to port.

A multi-system setup with 5 systems across, stacked 3 systems high could burn as much as 260 barrels per hour. The ship can be anchored with the bow into the wind allowing the horizontal discharge to be off the stern. All PLC controls for each unit can be monitored from a central control station on board.

System Technical Details

Typical System Description - 60FM-CGOL Marine Waste Oil Combustion System is designed to raise the temperature of the firing chamber to the required operating temperature, thus assuring maximum destruction of any organics in the exhaust gas. The system package comes complete with oil burner, refractory lined chamber, stack, operating controls and when needed, the optional components described below.

Refractory Lined Carbon Steel Chamber

The package is constructed of carbon steel and lined with a combination of ceramic fiber, high temperature refractory materials, which is installed with stainless steel anchors to maintain integrity and mounted on structural steel legs. Chamber includes sight ports, thermal wells and a natural gas burner.

Oil Burner (CGOL Option)

The system may include one (1) packaged oil fired burner for maintaining the temperature of the chamber to the preset operating temperature as required. System comes complete with flame safety controls and safeties. A motorized, modulating gas valve regulates the burner output using the latest Honeywell digital controllers. Burner train components are supplied loose for field installation. Customer supplies the natural gas regulator.
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Operational Design

Controls (PLC Optional)

System operator may start and stop the system from the main panel or from remote inputs. Startup energizes and prove the combustion blower, start pre-purge timer, fuel pumps, start burner on #2 oil, prove set temperature and signal start of waste oil injection. Blower pressure and customer safety limits must be proven prior to burner ignition. Component failures will shut down the system while alerting the operator. Indicator panel lights will display fault.

The system is designed to operate with a variable waste gas input with natural gas being controlled to maintain a preset temperature. System self-regulates fuel input to maintain temperature and adjust conditions to match the flow of the waste gas stream.

Control Operation

The system can mix a portion of #2 fuel oil to maintain flame stability. The #2 oil and waste oil will be connected to the suction side of the fuel pump with motorized isolation valves. The system will startup and run on #2 oil until the preset "At Temp" is reached.  When the correct temperature is reached, the waste oil valve will open while the #2 oil valve will begin to close. This process is completed slowly to allow the system to monitor the flame with the UV Scanner. The scanner will produce a flame strength signal that will assure an optimal flame pattern. If a ratio is reached which lessens the flame strength, the waste oil valve will not open further. The fuel mixture is fed to the suction side of the pump, feeding into a liquid cyclone to blend evenly with any water.

Note: The UV scanner signal is connected to the Flame Safety, which produces a 0-5 VDC signal. This signal is sent to a PID controller producing a 4-20ma signal to operate the mixing valves. An over-ride will hold the valves to #2 oil only until the "At Temp" is reached.

Control Components

This package includes one (1) Hoffman Nema 4 control panel, for remote control and monitoring and maintains a preset temperature utilizing a type K T/C and 4-20ma digital controllers. System is monitored and operated with Honeywell DC-3000 temperature controllers located in the main panel. All controls and safeties are operated from the main panel as the controller modulates the gas to maintain temperature. Contacts will be provided for remote start and stop, pressure limit switch and for the motor starter coil.

System Specifications

60FM-40-CGOL 40 FT

Burner Capacity - Based on IMO specifications
Burning Output - 60,000,000 BTU per Hour
Crude/#2 Waste Oil - 850 GPH (water content <60%)
Flue gas temperature - Maximum 1,800oF
Flue gas volume - 12,000 SCFM
Stack Diameter - 48 inches
Compressed air pressure - 100 PSI Consumption - Air atomizing oil burner - 8 CFM

Power details
Demand factor - 230/480/3/60   20 KWH

Alarms: local and remote indication of high temperature, flame failure or low temperature
Note: In the event of a power failure, the system shuts off fuel input and goes on standby, requiring a prepurge cycle upon restart.

Ambient shell temperature
Minimum 0oC and maximum 45oC for standard equipment.

Operating Parameters

Flow Rate - 17 BPH per hour (<60% H2O)
Operating Temperature - 1,400oF
Refractory Lining - 6 inches
Chamber Volume - More than 700 ft3
Maximum Burner Input - 70MM BTU per Hour
Oil Pressure - 50 PSI
Destruction Efficiency - Greater than 99% At 1.500oF

30FM-20-CGOL 20 FT

Burner Capacity - Based on IMO Specifications
Burning Output - 30,000,000 BTU per Hour
Crude/#2 Waste Oil - 425 GPH (Water content <60%)
Flow Rate - 8 BPH per Hour (<60% H2O)
Flue gas temperature - Maximum 1,800oF
Flue gas volume - 6,000 SCFM
Stack Diameter - 36 inches
Compressed air pressure - 100 PSI Consumption - Air atomizing oil burner - 8 CFM

Power details
Demand factor - 230/480/3/60   10 KWH

Alarms: local and remote indication of high temperature, flame failure or low temperature
Note: In the event of a power failure, the system shuts off fuel input and goes on standby, requiring a prepurge cycle upon restart.

Ambient shell temperature
Minimum 0oC and maximum 45oC for standard equipment.

Operating Parameters

Flow Rate - 8 BPH per hour (<60% H2O)
Operating Temperature - 1,400oF
Refractory Lining - 6 inches
Chamber Volume - More than 700 ft3
Maximum Burner Input - 70MM BTU per Hour
Oil Pressure - 50 PSI
Destruction Efficiency - Greater than 99% At 1.500oF